cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
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cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 
selected by Tu recepcja
cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 
selected by Tu recepcja
cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 
selected by Tu recepcja
cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 
selected by Tu recepcja
cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 
selected by Tu recepcja
cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 
selected by Tu recepcja
cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…
Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 
selected by Tu recepcja

cross-connect:

Ivan Prieto is a young Spanish artist (sculptor and illustrator) based in Berlin focused on creation of weird, bizarre and mysterious characters. His sculptures are exceptionally thought-provoking and disturbing. The characters often have gruesome, stirring and grotesque expressions…

Behance I Facebook I Saatchi Art 

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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

For the most part, American bankers whose rash pursuit of profit brought on the 2008 global financial collapse didn’t get indicted. They got bonuses.

Odds are that scandal would have played out differently in Vietnam, another nation struggling with misbehaving bankers.

Amid a sweeping cleanup of its financial sector, Vietnam has sentenced three bankers to death in the past six months.

One duo now on death row embezzled roughly $25 million from the state-owned Vietnam Agribank. Their co-conspirators caught decade-plus prison sentences.

homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube
homoarigato:

That’s What She Said - A queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.
Website
Facebook
Tumblr
Instagram
Twitter
YouTube

homoarigato:

That’s What She SaidA queer, Asian-American web series following the lives of 5 friends in Los Angeles. Created out of a desire to see positive Asian representations in the media, as well as to give voice to the often untold stories of queer Asian women, the series chronicles the lives of five fictional characters – Leslie, Rae, Shin, Baby, and Nic – within the queer sphere of the greater Los Angeles area.

(via stopwhitewashing)

artmusicvegan:

Two documentaries by filmmaker Jeanette Kong. Watch the trailers and read more HERE.
'Half: The Story of a Chinese-Jamaican Son'| “Caught between two cultures and races – Vincent Lee was born to a Chinese father and a Jamaican mother. After his father’s pre-mature death, five-year-old Vincent sailed across the ocean to southern China”…
'The Chiney Shop' | From the 1930s to the 1970s, Chinese-owned groceries were located on the street corners of rural and urban Jamaica. filmmaker Jeanette Kong grew up in a Chinese-owned shop in Kingston and details the complex relationship and social interaction between shop-owners and locals. 
artmusicvegan:

Two documentaries by filmmaker Jeanette Kong. Watch the trailers and read more HERE.
'Half: The Story of a Chinese-Jamaican Son'| “Caught between two cultures and races – Vincent Lee was born to a Chinese father and a Jamaican mother. After his father’s pre-mature death, five-year-old Vincent sailed across the ocean to southern China”…
'The Chiney Shop' | From the 1930s to the 1970s, Chinese-owned groceries were located on the street corners of rural and urban Jamaica. filmmaker Jeanette Kong grew up in a Chinese-owned shop in Kingston and details the complex relationship and social interaction between shop-owners and locals. 
artmusicvegan:

Two documentaries by filmmaker Jeanette Kong. Watch the trailers and read more HERE.
'Half: The Story of a Chinese-Jamaican Son'| “Caught between two cultures and races – Vincent Lee was born to a Chinese father and a Jamaican mother. After his father’s pre-mature death, five-year-old Vincent sailed across the ocean to southern China”…
'The Chiney Shop' | From the 1930s to the 1970s, Chinese-owned groceries were located on the street corners of rural and urban Jamaica. filmmaker Jeanette Kong grew up in a Chinese-owned shop in Kingston and details the complex relationship and social interaction between shop-owners and locals. 

artmusicvegan:

Two documentaries by filmmaker Jeanette Kong. Watch the trailers and read more HERE.

'Half: The Story of a Chinese-Jamaican Son'| “Caught between two cultures and races – Vincent Lee was born to a Chinese father and a Jamaican mother. After his father’s pre-mature death, five-year-old Vincent sailed across the ocean to southern China”…

'The Chiney Shop' | From the 1930s to the 1970s, Chinese-owned groceries were located on the street corners of rural and urban Jamaica. filmmaker Jeanette Kong grew up in a Chinese-owned shop in Kingston and details the complex relationship and social interaction between shop-owners and locals. 

(via stopwhitewashing)

Joe Hisaishi in Budokan - Studio Ghibli 25 Years Concert (~2hrs)

Not only TOMS, but also Starbucks and even Lockheed Martin and Wal-Mart have learned that linking their products to charitable causes makes for good business. We no longer buy only what we need, or even what broadcasts our identity. We buy what makes us feel like good people, and what makes us feel like members of a good, global community. The easy way to look at TOMS is to praise their charitable work. The harder, more troubling way to look at TOMS is to acknowledge it as an example of how corporations have assumed work most often associated with self-identified religious organizations: building community, engaging in charity, and cultivating morals.

TOMS is not alone in its willingness to link progressive social action with consumer spending. In fact, it exemplifies a broader corporate embrace of “conscious capitalism.” Coined by Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, this business model assumes that “the best way to maximize profits over the long-term” is to orient business toward a “higher purpose.” So Starbucks sells coffee to “Put America Back to Work,” the (RED) campaign raises money to fight AIDS, and—in the best example yet—Sir Richard’s Condom Company sends a condom to Haiti for each one it sells (“doing good never felt better”). Meanwhile, Bank of America logos decorate PRIDE banners and Lockheed Martin brags that it is a “champion of diversity.”

The globalization of neoliberal capitalism, and particularly the popularity of “conscious capitalism” as a practice and a discourse, signals a change in the landscape of U.S. religion and politics. “Neoliberalism” most often refers to a loosely cohering set of economic, social, and political policies that (1) seek to secure human flourishing through the imposition of free markets and (2) locate “freedom” in individual autonomy, expressed through consumer choice. But it is also a mode of belonging, where ritual acts of consumption initiate individuals into a global community of consumer agents. Within neoliberal logics of religious and political action, consumer transactions and corporate expansion are recast as forms of spiritual purification and missionary practice. And within conscious capitalism, the “higher purpose” is a world in which all people have a chance (or obligation) to participate in free markets—understood as a multicultural community of consumers.

For Mycoskie—whose title is “Chief Shoe Giver”—building this multicultural community is a theological mandate. He frames his Christian faith as a component of his personal relationship to the company. At the evangelical Global Leadership Conference, keynote speaker Mycoskie answered a question about whether TOMS represents any “biblical principles”: “TOMS represents a lot of different biblical principles. But the one I go back to again and again is the one in Proverbs. Give your first fruits and your vats will be full. … Because we did that and stayed true to our one-to-one model [even amidst financial strain], we’ve been incredibly blessed. We really did give our first fruits.”

In non-confessional settings, TOMS proffers a humanistic version of this prosperity gospel, recast for a neoliberal age. Losing the Bible quotes, the company emphasizes that the “fruits of faith”—in this case, economic success—abound for those who embody the ideals of authenticity, good intentions, and service. Or, “higher purpose” is profitable. TOMS is successful because it creates opportunities for people to live into their own “purpose” through a simple transaction: buying a pair of shoes.

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

(via stopwhitewashing)

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

“It’s enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment.”
— Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude

(via introspectivepoet)